Using documentary and fine art photography as a tool for social change.

Current Projects

Darkness into Light

Immortalising tributes donated after the March 15th Mosque terrorist attacks. This  multidisciplinary collaboration aims is to make a contribution to our community by encouraging them towards considering dialogue, tolerance, inclusivity and maintaining an informed, empathetic and socially conscious society. More about this project will be published on March 15th 2020. Read More …

Widows of Shuhada (Martyrs)

A podcast series with accompanying photography, depicts the lives of four women whose husbands were killed on March 15th. From the Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca in August through to first anniversary of the attacks. This project was funded as the final initiatives from the RNZ/NZ On Air Joint Innovation Fund and Created with Plains FM 96.9.  Read More…

Void

“The beauty of strangeness lies in the freedom for self-creation, “ Howard Stein

Janneth Gil uses her art as a tool for social change and focuses her work on making an impact on problems that rise from discrimination and excesses of individualism. Largely drawn from Janneth Gil’s autobiographical narratives and originally a curated installation, this iteration of Void is in the form of a video work, where Gil explores ideas of transculturalism and identity construction in the context of immigration. Read more…

 

Edge of the East: A Christchurch documentary project

The Edge of the East project is a collaboration between Christchurch City Libraries and the University of Canterbury to create a documentary photographic record of New Brighton. Read more…

Our Voices

The goal of ‘Our Voices’ is to educate people about the lives of those with disabilities and their support networks. Janneth’s belief is that this education will lead to more open, tolerant and equal communities that celebrate difference rather than stigmatize it. Read more…

Indelible Identity

A few years ago while traveling to Bogotá–the city I was born, I found myself walking in a dangerous neighbourhood looking for a tattoo parlour. At the time having a tattoo in Colombia was still related to lower class individuals and criminals. But for me, tattooing had different connotations as I was already living in New Zealand. For me, tattooing was part of our own identity, ethnicity, and culture. Read more…

In One’s Own Land

Sam’s family survived the Cambodian Genocide–they were escaping from imprisonment when he was born. As a small child, he lived horrific experiences at the Khao-I-Dang refugee camp in Thailand. His early life is a crude example of what no child should have to endure; yet his life now is an example to follow. Sam reveals his story with sincerity and openness. He tells of his transformation, the various hardships during his life, and also the acceptance he has found as a refugee in New Zealand. Read the book here…